2017 Glass: The Award for Change

THIS GIRL CAN - PHENOMENAL WOMEN

ClientSPORT ENGLAND
Category A01. Glass
TitleTHIS GIRL CAN - PHENOMENAL WOMEN
Product/ServiceTHIS GIRL CAN
Entrant FCB INFERNO London, UNITED KINGDOM
Idea Creation FCB INFERNO London, UNITED KINGDOM
Media Placement MEDIACOM London, UNITED KINGDOM
PR MISCHIEF PR London, UNITED KINGDOM
Production SOMESUCH London, UNITED KINGDOM
Production 2 SOUNDTREE MUSIC London, UNITED KINGDOM
Production 3 FRAMESTORE London, UNITED KINGDOM
Credits
Name Company Position
Owen Lee FCB Inferno Chief Creative Officer
Al Young FCB Inferno Creative Partner
Sharon Jiggins FCB Inferno Managing Director
Vicki Holgate FCB Inferno Chief Strategy Officer
Hollie Loxley FCB Inferno Managing Partner
Laura Pirkis FCB Inferno Senior Strategist
Isabelle Soskice FCB Inferno Account Director
Alice Poole FCB Inferno Senior Account Manager
Martin McAllister FCB Inferno Creative Director
Ben Edwards FCB Inferno Art Director
Kim Gehrig Somesuch Director
Tim Nash Somesuch Executive Producer
Jason Ayers FCB Inferno Head of Broadcast
Hanna Davis FCB Inferno Production Assistant
Lee Groombridge Somesuch Producer
Tim Lindsay Trim Editing Editor
Sarah Lefkowith FCB Inferno Copywriter
Alex Sheppard FCB Inferno Social Community Manager
Alex Gill FCB Inferno Senior Designer
Richard Bagley FCB Inferno Senior Artworker
Bridie Scriven FCB Inferno Project Manager
Charlie Campbell Charlie Campbell Photography Photographer

Creative Execution

Moving from fighting fear of judgement to full-throttle female empowerment, our campaign is an all-out celebration of phenomenal women getting active. To re-engage our audience, we launched with a nationwide poster campaign on 27.01.17 that introduced our cast of real women. Following a series of teasers on social media, our film went live on our social channels at midday on 24.02.17, coinciding with our influencer launch event. Using Instagram Stories, we built buzz amongst our community and within hours of going live, we were trending #1 on Facebook and Twitter. As our film played out on TV and VOD (24.02.17 to 26.03.17), we told the stories of our women in content films. Capitalising on unprecedented engagement levels, we enabled our community to create their own posters using our app. We ran the resulting UGC as digital OOH in malls nationwide, whilst a Snapchat filter reached our younger demographic.

In the three months since launch, our films have been viewed over 22.5m times and we generated 209 pieces of press coverage. Our engagement levels have smashed platform benchmarks. Our Facebook community has grown by 14.5% and over 18,000 digital posters have been created using our app. Our Snapchat filter achieved 16m impressions (vs. 8-14m platform benchmark) and was shared over 7.3m times. Most importantly, we are already seeing evidence that our campaign has inspired women. Early quantitative tracking has shown a significant increase in the number of women who have got more active as a result of the campaign and our social media channels are full of women describing how it has inspired them to exercise. We are helping empower them to get active – and seeing a powerful behaviour change that over time will close the gender gap and permanently change how the fitness sector speaks to women.

In a climate where women felt they had no place in the world of exercise, our strategy was to present a new norm that convinced them otherwise. We sought to unite our broadest audience yet (from 14-40yo to 14-70yo) behind a powerful message: that women are phenomenal; they belong in the world of exercise, however they get active. We wanted our film and poster campaign to communicate this message to the entirety of our target audience. Designed to inspire as many women as possible, we wanted to celebrate this sense of belonging and present a new norm – where all women felt this way. Our social content was designed to drive self-identification. By encouraging women to share their exercise experiences publicly, we could help cement their behaviour and ensure that more women saw others like them getting active. The more this happened, the more they’d feel they could join in.