THE SUPPORTING ACT

Short List
ClientBBC
Category A10. Animation
TitleTHE SUPPORTING ACT
Product/ServiceBBC ONE
Entrant BBC CREATIVE London, UNITED KINGDOM
Idea Creation BBC CREATIVE London, UNITED KINGDOM
Production BLINKINK London, UNITED KINGDOM
Credits
Name Company Position
Laurent Simon BBC Creative ECD
Aidan McClure BBC Creative ECD
Arvid Harnqvist BBC Creative Senior Creative
Amar Marwaha BBC Creative Senior Creative
Ken Rodrigues BBC Creative Producer
Astrid Reiner BBC Creative Project Manager
Jenny Broad BBC Creative Production Manager
James Wood BBC Creative Head of Production
Mike Lean BBC Creative Head of Planning
Kerry Moss BBC Head of Marketing
Harriet Gunning BBC Marketing Manager
Elliot Dear Blinkink Director
Bart Yates Blinkink Producer
Benjamin Lole Blinkink Producer
Stephen McNally Blinkink VFX Supervisor / Lead

Tell the jury about type(s) of animation used and summarise any relevant challenges or techniques.

The film was created using a technique that had never been done before. It combined stop frame animation with CGI facial mapping in order to get a handcrafted feeling coupled with very precise emotional performances.

Write a short summary of what happens in the film

‘The Supporting Act’ follows a 10-year-old girl who practices day in and day out to give the most important dance performance of her life at the her school’s Christmas talent show. Her dad is always with her, but he’s busy with other things such as work and Christmas chores. But that doesn’t stop the girl from rehearsing wherever she can. She dances at home, at the supermarket, on the high street and when she’s with her dad at work. The dad stay distracted up until the moment his daughter freezes on stage during her big performance. It’s only then we realise that he has been paying attention all along because he guides his terrified daughter through her moves. They then dance together in a wonderful moment of ‘oneness’.

Cultural/Context information for the jury

BBC One is the UK’s biggest TV channel, but it’s size and scale can be its weakness. It can feel like it’s for the people, but not of the people. Our challenge was to warm up and humanize the channel, reminding people that there are some things we all share. Never is this sentiment more appropriate than at Christmas where we wanted to makes everyone feel that it’s a bit more special because of BBC One.