MAKE BLOOD CANCER VISIBLE

Short List
ClientJANSSEN
Category F01. Regulated
TitleMAKE BLOOD CANCER VISIBLE
Product/ServiceBLOOD CANCER AWARENESS
Entrant JANSSEN High Wycombe, UNITED KINGDOM
Idea Creation PUBLICIS LIFEBRANDS London, UNITED KINGDOM
Idea Creation 2 PAUL COCKSEDGE STUDIO London, UNITED KINGDOM
Production PAUL COCKSEDGE STUDIO London, UNITED KINGDOM
Credits
Name Company Position
Shaheed Peera Publicis LifeBrands Executive Creative Director
Khalid Latif Publicis LifeBrands Associate Creative Director
Jonathan Webb Publicis LifeBrands Art Director
Paul Cocksedge Paul Cocksedge Studio Design Director
Dimuthu Jayawardana Publicis LifeBrands Senior Planner
Marionne Lugay Publicis LifeBrands Account Director
Nina Tsalapatanis Publicis LifeBrands Account Director
Katie McMorran Publicis LifeBrands Business Unit Director
Mark Cocksedge Paul Cocksedge Studio Photographer

Describe any restrictions or regulations regarding Healthcare/RX/Pharma communications in your country/region including

In the UK, pharma companies cannot promote prescription drugs or products to consumers. This piece does not promote a prescription-only product and functions as disease awareness for the general public. It adheres to the ABPI Code of Practice.

Describe the target audience and why your work is relevant to them. Pharma audience types:

The target audience for this piece was the general public, which includes patients and healthcare professionals alike. Public awareness and understanding of blood cancer is shockingly low despite it being the 3rd biggest cancer killer in the UK. Raising awareness of its signs and symptoms is beneficial to everyone.

Write a short summary of what happens in the ambient execution or campaign.

Together with a high-profile designer, we created a striking typographical forest of 104 names (our insight: 104 people are diagnosed with blood cancer every day in the UK). Made from reinforced polystyrene and steel, each represented a real patient currently living with blood cancer. Every sculpture was perfectly sized to match the height of the person they symbolised. The arrangement reflected the patterns that occur when people gather in crowds, and set in a recurring typeface intended to emphasise their shared experiences. The installation was designed to be arresting, intriguing, shocking and hopeful. On closer inspection, people found that every name had a real story to tell. Plaques on each name told stories of determination, hope and success. Two separate structures detailed the signs and symptoms of blood cancer and directed people to a website. They stood in Paternoster Square outside St Paul’s Cathedral in London for 30 days.